Ghost Story: The House

The House

Sebastian Costantini

“Hey Matt,” my best friend Teddy called out. “Can we please leave?”

“Fine, let’s go,” I called back.

Half drunk, I slowly walked away from the house. I looked at the time on my phone: 2:53 AM. As I climbed into the car, Teddy said, “Are you going to jeopardize my safety by driving drunk?”

“Relax, I only had like four.”

“But-”

“Trust me, I’m fine.”

Teddy and I are not people you would think would be best friends. His forte is studying and martial arts. I prefer hockey and girls. His only foible is that he finds girls erotic, but he doesn’t know how talk to them. I started the car, put on waze, and began to drive.

The party was in the middle of nowhere. There were no streetlights, and all I could see was woods. I looked over at Teddy. He was asleep. I looked down at my phone. Waze showed us arriving at 3:34 AM. Not realizing that I was slowly drifting off the road, I looked back just in time to see the tree. I didn’t have enough time to scream. The ear piercing crunch of metal and glass could be heard for miles. As the car compressed, the airbags sprang out, and I was slammed in the face. Slowly, I lifted up my head, feeling my face. I looked at my hand, mesmerized by the blood spilling from my nose. Oh no, Teddy!! “Teddy! Teddy!!” I screamed. I felt for a pulse, finding none. My eyes widened. Tears and blood stained my shirt as I desperately shook my best friend. “Wake up!” I exited the car and looked around frantically. Only woods and darkness. Shaking, I walked back to what was left of the car and grabbed my phone. Long cracks reached across the screen like icy fingers. It wouldn’t turn on. Screaming, I threw it into the woods. There has to be a house or something close to me. I turned back to the car. Don’t worry, Teddy! I’ll go find help! I decided to walk in the direction that we were driving in. I was a bleeding, crying, half-drunk mess walking on the side of the road, praying that I could find someone who would help me.

Finally, after what felt like hours of walking, I came across a house. It was in poor condition: broken mailbox, chipped paint, broken beams on the outside of the house, windows with holes in them, and shredded curtains. I almost decided to skip it. The house seemed precarious to me, but I needed help badly. Cautiously, I walked up to the front steps of the house, Every step creaked louder than the previous one. I looked into the window only to see darkness. The doorbell was cold to the touch. Pushing the button, I could hear no sounds coming from the inside of the house. Raising my hand to knock, I swallowed, and knocked once, hoping no one would answer the door. The door pushed open.

“Hello?” I called out, my voice quivering. I was sweating now. I took one step into the house, looking around. In front of me, I could barely make out a staircase and a hallway. Not knowing what to do next, I took another step into the house. Suddenly, a loud banging noise came from upstairs, followed by glass shattering. I turned and ran right into the door. It had closed and was locked from the outside. My heart pounded as I looked around, mouth open in fear. I could hear the sound of footsteps getting closer. I shook the door. The footsteps were moving faster now. Finally, I stepped back and hurled myself at the window. It shattered as I tumbled out and onto the porch. I began to sprint. My legs were begging for me to slow down, but I wouldn’t listen to them, too scared to even turn around.

I stopped when I could no longer keep going. I put my hands on my knees and caught my breath. I walked a little longer in the direction of the crash. No longer knowing what to do, I began crying again. As I continued walking, I found a car pulled over on the side of the road. Maybe they had found the crash and could save me. I began smiling for the first time since the party and walked towards the car. Then I stopped and my heart started beating rapidly again. I read the license plate of the car. 941 BHT. It was mine. “What is happening?” I said aloud. The car was untouched no scratches, nothing. I walked over and looked inside. Teddy was sleeping. I watched as his stomach rose and fell with every breath he took. My phone was on, waze still saying that we were going to arrive at 3:34. No time had passed. I opened the door, the noise causing Teddy to wake up. “Why are we pulled over?” I looked at him.

“I don’t know.”

“You don’t know? How can you not know?”

“Let’s just go home.”

I started the car and got back on the road. My mind was racing as I drove. I looked around until finally, we drove up to the house. I stopped the car. “What are you doing?” Teddy demanded.

“Just wait one second.”

“I don’t see what you’re looking at.”

I turned around. “You don’t see the house?” He had a quizzical look on his face.

“What house?”

“You actually don’t see the . . .”As I turned around I saw nothing. Only forest. The house had disappeared. “You’re tired,” he said to me. “Let me drive.” I could only nod. As he began the car, I looked back at where the house had been and saw it again, only this time, there was a fanged face with green glowing eyes, staring at me from the upstairs window.

 

The Bell Newspaper

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